preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload preload
techronicle_gamification

Gamification Factor in CRM

By Ali Safri

According to the Norton and Kaplan model of the Scorecard, business value can be achieved only if you have satisfied customers, which depends on the organization’s workforce working day in and out to provide up to the mark customer service. Traditionally, CRM systems are aimed to know the customers better so that they can be served better. However, the people on the frontline: agents, sales force, etc. are the workforce using the CRM information systems; they are the ones interacting with the customers and translating the service into value for the organization — thereby, doing all the work. I stress “Work.” What if work becomes play (like playing farmville), providing a mechanism to earn recognition among peers — a self-motivating incentive to accept new challenges and step up the ladder till the last round. Gamification is a technique of using human psychological preferences involving game design techniques on non-game applications to mold human behavior — so work becomes play, more engaging and more fun.  Market research by Gartner claims that by 2015, more than 50 percent of organizations will gamify their processes in some form.

The four principal drivers of enabling engagement using gamification are:

  1. Accelerated feedback cycles
  2. Clear goals and rules of play
  3. A compelling narrative
  4. Challenging, yet achievable tasks

A Routine Work “CRM”

The CRM and related systems are used in the organization for fulfilling, at bare minimum, the following in one way or another:

  1. Call agents handling customers
  2. Sales force (sales staff, managers, relationship managers)
  3. Customer support/service teams (resolving customer complaints/service requests)
  4. Surveys and campaigns
  5. Back-office operations

The existing CRM systems make the ‘manual’ element efficient by introducing information systems. But the ‘people’ element of efficiency is still not addressed. A formal office structure can help to achieve targets but:

  1. Cannot get maximum out of the best resources without their will
  2. Can force — but risking alienating the teams
  3. Cannot convince people to take new initiatives

In an enterprise, there are two forms of work:

  1. Work according to predefined processes
  2. Work because of process exceptions

Gamify

Both of the above scenarios can be gamified with a proportionate rewarding scheme.

Here is a routine process exception-based situation in any other enterprise.

Head of Department: “We have to resolve this high profile customer service request in the next two days?”

Department Employee argues, but accepts it, feeling stressed and overworked. Using Gamification, however, the Department Head can put a challenge as:

Target needs to be achieved in two days; reward = free office valet parking service for a week.

Employee feels rewarded, recognized, and works with greater efficiency.

It does not necessarily have to be a physical reward; it can be a freebie, recognition, or distinction. The human behavioral trait of being recognized is working here. In order to engage workforce, any of the following gamification techniques can be utilized:

Mission/Challenges

  1. A clear ability to define mission/challenges and what will be the achievement
  2. People who can define it (enterprise higher management as well as department heads)
  3. For maximum fun, a mission/challenge needs to be time- bound
  4. It needs to be verified that the mission/challenge is accomplished
  5. It can be a personal or oganization-wide mission/challenge

Achievements

  1. Reward points: Getting points for doing certain things. Each sales lead converted to a deal with a value > $1,000 earns 1 point.
  2. Badges: Progress in a specific area is rewarded by a badge. Conducting 100 surveys per week gets the badge for “Survey Veteran.”
  3. Progress Bar: Indicating how far you are from achieving the next badge to make the employee seek it.
  4. Leader board: Indicating the top 5 department-level employees with maximum Reward Points.
  5. Virtual/Physical Awards: Whoever gets 50 leads by the end of the week gets a voucher for $30 for Costa Coffee or officially allowed facebook for a week (personal mission by department head).
  6. A Redemption Scheme: Points accumulated over the year by an employee can be traded for a physical or virtual award. “I will redeem my 100,000 points for air miles.”
  7. Instant Gratification: A way to see the badges, points, rewards, etc. on the profile whenever the user logs in to keep him excited for more. Badges Badges provide a recognition mechanism without the enterprise spending on any physical reward. Once it is achieved, the psychological need to ‘Not Lose’ will keep the employees feel engaged, strive for better, and remain addicted to work like a game. For a CRM, the following can be the badges.

Badges

Badges provide a recognition mechanism without the enterprise spending on any physical reward. Once it is achieved, the psychological need to ‘Not Lose’ will keep the employees feel engaged, strive for better, and remain addicted to work like a game. For a CRM, the following can be the badges.

 

Weaving into CRM

CRM should give feedback to the employees at each stage for thier achievements:

  1. The reward points the employee gets
  2. The badges he has earned by completing some work
  3. The achievement rewards that are accomplished

Also, a collective summary should be present on the employee’s profile. Leader boards (department-wise, enterprise-wise) should be placed on accessible places for everyone to see and admire the top workers creating an aspiration to improve performance.

Market Players

The following CRM systems are now coming up with inherent gamification capabilities:

  1. Open Source Zurmo CRM
  2. LevelEleven
  3. Nitro for Salesforce (salesforce CRM add-on)
  4. WaveAccess for Microsoft CRM (add-on)

Conclusion

People are always seeking ways to incorporate fun into their lives. Confucius said, “Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.” Gamification is a promise to achieve this long-desired human dream.


Ali Asghar Safri specializes in emerging technology trends and how they can be utilized to solve real-world business problems. With over 12+ years experience of delivering software solutions, Ali is currently Manager Presales & Technology Strategy at Avanza Solution (MENA).

WordPress Image Lightbox